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, the left in the united states has plenty of problems with science when it comes to issues they don't support. it's about an hour and a half. >> my name is kenneth agreement and a resident scholar here at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy and environmental policy issues. i'm a scientist as well as alex and my doctoral degree is environmental science and engineering. so i am really excited to have this event today on science called "science left behind," alex's great book, and before we start, if i seem a little fuzzy you've seen the commercial that goes something like this when you pay too much for cable you through things and if you throw things people think you have anger issues some people think you have anger issues in your schedule up and you grow a scraggly beard and you start taking in stray animals and you can't stop taking in stray animals don't pay much for cable. i have my own version today to the appeal to the kafeel you have a checkup and when he gives you a check that you have a flu shot at a tetanus booster. when you have the booster do we get th
technological surprises from harming national security. the life science pros jects are rooted in military needs like meeting the threat of microbes or treating brain injury in the battlefield but they promise to transform civilian medicine. darpa specializes in high reward research. many of its projects sound like science fiction. when completed isu
will continue. investment in science, technology and higher education, encouraging more young people to study science, technology, engineering and math, make sure that we are bringing young minds with the creativity and engineering backgrounds to create the economy is for the future is so important. that has been the lifeblood of the economy and it must continue. saving the manned space exploration program and insuring the long term future of nasa, and essentials generator for our economy, insuring that stay at home moms and dads to work so hard raising children and contributing to the community to save for retirement. and easing the marriage tax penalty by doubling the standard ridge is a few of the things that i hope will continue to be championed as i leave. it has been such an honor to serve in the united states senate and i leave with the hope that the values that built america into
with interactive exhibits making science fun. a memory wall is up now where staff and visitors are sharing photos and thoughts about four decades of experiences here. one of those visitors who came back is brian matthews. >> it made a big impression on my childhood. i have vivid memories of it. >> brian is an engineer with autodesk and expert what is known as reality capture. he decided he should be doing it here. >> i called up our friends, like any other experiment they were game. >> he got a few other volunteers and they are working as fast as they can to make a record of the building and exhibits. they are using a couple different technologies including one that starts with photos from a still camera. you take photos from different angles and an amazing software puts them together. >> it can analyze two dimensional pictures, and make a three dimensional model from an ordinary camera. >> they are icing laser scanners. a sophisticated software programmable analyzes the millions of data points and combines them. the image is so detailed it could create an exact replica of the space and everythin
in 1969, first of the kind exhibit making science fun. a memory wall is up now where staff and visitors are sharing photos and thoughts about four decades of experiences here. one of those visitors that came back to take a look is brian matthews. >> it made a big impression in my childhood. i wanted to save it for the future. >> brian is an engineer with autodesk. he is expert in reality capture and he decided he should be doing it here. >> so i called up our friends and like any other experiment they were game. >> he got a few other volunteers and they are working as fast as they can to make a record of the building and exhibits. they are using different technologies including one that starts with photos from a still camera. you take photos from different animals and feed them into computer and amazing software program puts them together in this incredible image. that software can analyze the two dimensional pictures and make a model from an ordinary camera. >> they are also using laser cameras where the exhibits are. a sophisticated software programmable lies the data points and the r
, science changes. nothing is more worthless than a science textbook from the '50s. >> the word shouldn't change from the original constitution, surely. >> my words aren't based on the constitution. >> i get that, but what it is is about fairness and equality. i went to see "lincoln" the movie a few weeks ago. it was a riveting movie. daniel day-lewis was great as lincoln. it was all about how he fought in his last few months as president to get slavery abolished. there were millions of americans who thought slavery was acceptable who were outraged at what he was doing. he was not trying to make something popular for the moment. he knew instinctively it was just wrong, unfair, unequal. >> and why did he know that? because it's in the bible. >> but we -- >> it's in the bible. he was building it on biblical truth. the bible says that every man should be free. >> right, but you don't think every man should be free and equal. >> no -- of course we're free. and of course we're equal. >> what does that mean? >> you can love anybody you want to. >> but you don't think a gay man or woman should
, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is capable? how can we pursue this in politics? hobbes asked, what is the worst that can happen in politics? and how can
have to do is look at what works. this is not rocket science. i came to washington as a novice in politics, believing in the power of ideas, seeing how ideas can revolutionize different industries, can create new products and services meeting the needs of customers everywhere. and that's what i hoped we could do here in washington. maybe naively i went to work in the house, often working with the heritage foundation to create a better product here in washington. i saw social security, and not many people look below the surface, but we knew it was going broke. we knew we were taking in money that people were paying for this social security retirement benefit, but we were spending it all. and i thought, what an opportunity it would be for future generations, for my children, if we actually saved what people were putting into social security for their retirement. and you didn't have to do too much math to see that even for middle-class workers that americans could be millionaires when they retired if we even kept half of what was put into social security for them. it seemed like a
of choice meaning they kind of look like they are science science-fiction and that is deliberate. they are sort of modeled after science-fiction in order to appeal to the network engineers that are deciding where to put their network connections and where to connect to other networks. so when you walk and it's a bit like walking into a machine. their buildings inside are incredibly loud but incredibly cold from all the air-conditioners to keep the equipment cool. hugh also have a heated ceiling to obscure cables and there usually cages around, big steel cages maybe half the size of the hotel room and each belongs to network and that is where they keep their equipment securely and then run a wire to the top of the cage and drop it down into the cage of another network and interconnected that way. that is the physical internet connection and the internet world. >> host: when you look at the infrastructure of the wires of the internet, what did our those wires made of and what are they carrying? >> guest: predominantly the centers of the internet, the most important places, they are
expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that as science and the rationality -- as the disenchantment of the world's, pre-modern forces will lose their history. the two most important of these are religion. events refute the liberal expectancy. religion still drives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer a very brief placement of americans foundries. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. this spot is a convenient demarcation. the agents -- ancients saw to enlarge the likelihood of the emergence of noble leaders. machiavelli, however, took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew that nothing would ever be made from the crooked timber of humanity. machiavelli was no democrat. he reoriented politics towards accommodations, strong and predictable forces rising from a great constant, human nature common to all people in all stations. for 44 years, machiavelli and luther
this evening's collaboration of our national news and science programs. yesterday, she sat down with education secretary arne duncan for the special. it was the former chicago public school superintendent's first interview since the killings. here's part of their conversation. >> secretary duncan where does the responsibility lie for action here? >> it lies on all of us. all of us as parents, as community leaders, as religious leaders, as political leaders. no one gets to pass on this. and this is to the a time to point fingers or lay blame. often these things, there are lots of inclinations to do that but this is complex and anyone who wants to say there is a simple answer here i think does a great disservice to the complexity and urgency of fundamentally trying to make our country a safer place for our children. >> ifill: the president has asked the committee that you will be on, that vice president biden is going to spearhead to come up with solution or approaches within a month, before the state of the union speech. do you worry that the outrage is going to fade before that happens? >> i d
. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school massacre still fresh. there were more fatal shootings, including one in western new york, where an attacker lay in wait for a fire crew. >> responding firefighters when they pulled up on the scene started receiving -- were fired upon. >> police speaking shortly after a home and car erupted in flames. it was arson they said later that turned out to be an ambush. >> it does appear that it was a trap that was set. for responding first responders. >> gunmen killed two volunteer firefighters and wounded two others then killed himself. police identified him as william sp
and science editor john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. >>> crews clearing mud and debris from a sliding hillside in oakland. the pile of mud started coming down this morning and left debris in the street. one lane was closed while crews worked in the area. >>> significant rain yesterday. you saw it coming down hard for a time. these are some of the totals sunday. the rain dumping. almost 3 inches of rain. bolder creek, half foot of rain, 5 inches of rain. redwood city. looks like we will see more showers tomorrow. what i am tracking is this next weather system. nice looking system but nothing like what we saw. it will get in here tomorrow and bring rain. when i get back, i will break down the timing and we will go through it hour by hour so you can plan out your day. but the showers will be there. see you back here in a bit. >>> and we want to report breaking news to you. these are live pictures from news chopper 2. a number of emergency vehicles on the road, this is highway 84. near 680. and we understand right now we are hearing there are possible injuries in an accident, a head on collision b
reported in the history of science. the last ten years goes down as the hottest ten years recorded in the history of science and that means more wacky weather, more moisture, more energy. global warming is a misnomer. it should be called global swing. >> which means the world doesn't end tomorrow. it's just every little event is worse or inkre meantycrementally worse than before. >> you look at all the glaciers are receding. the ice caps has diminished by 50% just in the last 50 years. an area the size of united states in terms of ice disappeared this year over the polar ice caps. the seasons are changing. summer is longer winter is shorter, tropical diseases are moving north. all the indicators show that the earth is warming up and that's what's driving some of this wacky weather. >> duh that show more or could we snap back? >> get used to it. we could be experiencing more 100-year flooding storms, hurricanes because there's more energy circumstance lating. we could argue how much human activity is driving it but everybody agrees the earth is heating up ther
by nutritionist chris crowley and jen sacheck. you need both to do it. >> hard. >> there's science to it. >> there's heavy science and we tell you all about it in the book. >> we know what happens when we eat junk food. we get father, but what happens inside the body? >> a lot of things happen. we eat too much, we gain fat and it's toxic. it surrounds our vital organs, causes a toxic disease. it's killing us. >> there's two things here, what you eat and what you do with your body. what's going on, chris, with our body and what does it take to cement that habit? >> one of the nice things about the book, nice guys don't talk about exercise a lot. we talk about it all the time. it's the flywheel of maintenance. it does all kinds of stuff to help you lose weight, be healthier, more optimistic, or more energetic. we told people it makes a world of sense to work out semi hard six days a week. people go, what? way too scarey. but you have to do it. >> weight's become a bad busquos . >> wheat's become a bad buzz world. >> 1% of the americans have celiac disease and they can't have wheat in their diet. i t
and science editor john fowler ktvu news. >>> rescue crews spent the evening rescuing a horse. cracky the horse climbed up to the loft looking for more hay. he was stuck up there for three days. the horse is in good shape. >> officials at u.s. airways are looking into what caused one of it aircrafts to catch fire. it happened during maintenance check. the fire started in a small motor under the plane's trail. no one was aboard at the time. the plane was scheduled to fly to vancouver. passengers were put on another airplane craft two hours later. >>> there's word that mcafee is spending christmas in england. the pioneer wrote that he's safe in the country where he grew up. mcafee was born in england. the sun reports mcafee is hoping for a fresh start. mcafee has been in hiding from authorities in belize where he had been living. he is wanted for questioning in the death -- for the suspicious death of a neighbor. >>> ktvu's robert handa followed the mail carriers on their rout today. >> reporter: it's not exactly santa's sleigh but some san jose postal carriers including nancy ray hit
gate, that's it. >> reporter: we saw this open topsighted seeing bus. health and science editor john fowler ktvu news. >>> rescue crews spent the evening rescuing a horse. cracky the horse climbed up to the loft looking for more hay. he was stuck up there for three days. the horse is in good shape. >> officials at u.s. airways are looking into what caused one of it aircrafts to catch fire. it happened during maintenance check. the fire started in a small motor under the plane's trail. no one was aboard at the time. the plane was scheduled to fly to vancouver. passengers were put on another airplane craft two hours later. >>> there's word that mcafee is spending christmas in england. the pioneer wrote that he's safe in the country where he grew up. mcafee was born in england. the sun reports mcafee is hoping for a fresh start. mcafee has been in hiding from authorities in belize where he had been living. he is wanted for questioning in the death -- for the suspicious death of a neighbor. >>> ktvu's robert handa followed the mail carriers on their rout today. >> reporter: it's not exa
of vietnam. >> the economy exploded, created the interstate system, invested in science. >> and balanced the budget while he was doing it. and there was huge pressure on him to spend more defense, and he was the one guy who understood how to stop that. he used to talk about "those boys at the pentagon," i know them. >> he knew those boys at the pentagon. doris, here's a great example of lyndon johnson, the man you knew so well. lyndon johnson wouldn't go out holding press conferences talking act eisenhower. this segment is not going to be about ike, but it is -- we're just talking about presidents who rise and presidents who fall. eisenhower's on his way up by now. but you had, of course, lbj constantly drawing on johnson's -- on eisenhower's wisdom. >> and, you know, the great thing about eisenhower, too, was just that he was so popular among the people. that great song "i like ike, because ike is easy to like," no one else had such a good song. but lbj is rising, too, and i think it's about time that he does. he left under such a cloud, the scar in vietnam so, so painful at the time he
aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ let's stay together >>> when you look at this picture, what do you think? at what point was it taken? >> i think we were campaigning in iowa. >> so why were you hugging her so hard in iowa? >> because i love my wife. >> and also, i hadn't seen him in a while. when you're campaigning, we're two ships passing in the night. and the first time i saw him was when i walked on stage to greet him. and that's my honey giving me a hug. >> how do you keep the fire going? >> that's a good question. >> you know, we've been married now 20 years. >> mm-hmm. >> like every marriage, i think, you know, you have your ups and you have your downs. but if you work through the tough times, the respect and love that you feel deepens. >> and then there's a lot of laughter, you know. >> and you're funnier. >> yeah. for the most part. >> everybody thinks he's pretty funny. i'm funnier than people think. >> you are. >> that may be. you may be funnier than people think. >> barbara walters in th
is going to cost $10 million that is going to be built behind the science museum of virginia. there will be two full football folds, a field house with locker and weight rooms, a drill field and spectator areas. >>> at 6, a racy course on the 50 shades of gray is being offered at the university. now, it's an american studies class that will focus on the book's impasse on society. the professor believes the course is appropriate saying no other contemporaries text on sexuality transformed american culture the way this series has. >>> coming up, dairy clips. milk prices could double if lawmakers dilly dally any longer. why they need to get a move on it. and had to say that. >>> 2013 around the corner. what are you going to do to celebrate? coming up, what the preps are in new york city's time square. if you have a story idea, call the tipline at 202-895-3,000 end send us an e-mail if you want, www.fox5tips@wttg.com. back after this. ó if you have high blood pressure and get a cold get coricidin hbp. the number one pharmacist recommended cold brand designed for people with hig
. >> there is science and magic involved. it's quite fascinating. >> we kind of come to the end of it all. >> yeah, you are right. one of the last time zones. >> with hawaii the last. >> hawaii the last. >> tony said it, norad will be tracking him and there is a web site to go to. >> gps is great. they can track santa. >> we will talk to them during the 9:00 hour. there is their web site. they will track him a little bit later -- has he already started. >> he is fuji heading for -- >> he already started. >> wow. >> they have the number of gifts delivered. >> i don't know how they know that. >> there you go, kennedys, that's the answer. merry christmas to you. if you have a question you want answered, go to myfoxdc.com and click on the weather tab. >> so exciting. >> i love it. >>> we will see if there is excitement happening on the roadways. let's check in with jeff. >> if we were checking norad, we would see more activity than on the road. prince george's county, nothing like looking at a sunrise in a black and white camera. light volume around the beltway in both directions. over to the wilson bridge
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ashley: so what is the bright spot for next year? oppenheimer says it's domino's pizza, anywhere you slice it. the stock moving higher today. right now up just about 1 1/3%, up 56 cents at 43.37. oppenheimer says look the pizza maker in a good position for 2013, thanks to its same-store sales, innovation and international business, oppenheimer also raising its price target on domino's 6 bucks from 44 to 50. it's right now at 43.39. domi domino's up almost 30% for the year. it's been an amazing day. down 148 points at one point. dave asman, shibani joshi turn up and we're up 10 points. take it away. david: it is not the number. it's the turn around. about 150 point turn around. shibani: just to show you how volatile the markets are and how sensitive they are to comments coming out of washington and any advancement on the fiscal debt talks, the talk that congress is coming back to work on sunday, that turned everything around. david: let's go to
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
. that is in the art, science times, style -- it means basically telling you how to live. when it becomes cultural criticism, it is telling you what opera to go to or whether "the nutcracker" is good. it turns out we know from surveys that people read a great deal more about health than they used to. people are reading the newspaper to find out how to take care when your elderly parents -- what happens when your foot falls asleep, if you go to a place 15,000 feet high you should take pills because somebody might drop dead, which happens to one of my colleagues. people are reading more for that. that is what they call value added journalism -- i call it how to live journalism. one thing about these extra sesections -- to sell something other than the record. -- the "times" used to have one page a week. one page a week. now think about the "times" and what it is -- it is highly different. the other thing they're doing better -- cultural criticism. i talked about with one member of the audience -- cultural criticism used to be really what might be called culture in new york. now it is every kind of c
his nose so bright? well, science has an answer. it's red all right. we will share it with you ahead. ♪ rudolph the red nosed reindeer. you'll go down in history. ♪ with the spark cash card from capital one, sven gets great rewards for his small business! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purche, everday! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great sinesses deserve great rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're
this collaboration of all our national news and science programs. check your local listings. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online and, as it's looking like the end is not upon us yet, again here monday evening. have a nice winter weekend. thanks for joining us. good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to le a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
. we look at the major advances in science and technology. "newsroom" starts now. good morning. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello wishing you and yours a very merry christmas. we begin this hour with pope benedict using his annual christmas message to speak about the hope for peace even in the most difficult times and situations. just hours ago the 85-year-old pope spoke before a crowd in st. peter's square and to millions of others watching around the world he says even in syria, a nation embroiled in a nearly two-year long civil war, peace is possible. >> translator: may peace bring for the people of syria, deeply wounded and divided by a conflict which does not spare even the defenseless and reaps innocent victims. once again, i appeal for an end to the bloodshed. easier access for the relief of refugees and the displaced and dialogue in the pursuit of a political solution to the conflict. >> the pope also spoke out against violence against christians in nigeria and wrapped up his address by delivering christmas greetings in 65 languages. >>> in bethlehem peop
or gay rights or whatever. even in the medical sciences, there is discrimination. so it turns out that more women die of heart disease now than all cancers combined. more women die of heart disease rather than men. more women than men die of heart disease. did you know that? i just was so shocked by some of these statistics. >> i didn't know some of these until i researched for this interview, and i saw why you were so strong about it. it's startling. >> 50 years of research have been done on men. i'll tell you a funny story too. you realize how powerful females are, that even in the research, a woman doctor discovered how to grow a heart from stem cells in a petri dish, whatever. how did she do it? you know how she did it? with only female stem cells because, literally, the male stem cells got lost. and they refused to ask for directions. this is true. can you imagine that? so i just believe breast cancer has done such an amazing job raising millions and millions and millions of dollars to help that disease. let's say 39,520 women died of breast cancer in the last couple of years
to cooperate with china on many other fronts. we have many other engagements in terms of science and technology, clean energy, collaboration's by our center for disease control, trying to look at the various world health problems, the solutions to which benefit united states as well. we will always have disagreements. we have disagreements with canada on trade issues. we have disagreements with france and mexico and many other countries. there is a mechanism by which we can all go to neutral refereeing of those issues. the wto is one way that we can do that. [inaudible] >> i did not have a chance to read that article. am not familiar with everything that was mentioned in that article. two months before the election, there was this big tough-on- china -- >> the pivot was announced almost a year before that. what set of the discussion of the exhibit was the announcement -- pivot was the announcement of rotating 2000 marines throughout australia. i do not think china should be fearful of 2000 marines hit in australia. -- in australia. our engagement with other countries throughout the asia- pacifi
it will save you money, as well. >>> later on, what do you get when santa claus meets a science fiction fantasy? stay tuned for our "world news now" christmas tradition called "st. nick and the space nicks." i've never seen this. i'm very excited. >> you have your mug now and you're going to go through that. so you're officially part of the overnight family. you've been indoctrinated with us now. >> i'm happy to be here. >> merry christmas. always good to have you. but first, it is a white christmas for parts of the country. philadelphia and many cities in the northeast got a few inches of snow, but it won't last long due to a coming meltdown. >> it's part of a system that snarled traffic and delayed airline passengers. as abc's alex perez reports. >> reporter: blankets of snow from central new york to northern california, creating christmas chaos for some parts of the country. >> we're hoping we don't sit on the runway. we did that the last time. >> reporter: in chicago, paula and her three daughters arrived early for their christmas eve flight. they are among the millions taking to the crowde
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. gee you are watching cnbc's "squawk on the street," live from the financial capital on the world. the opening bell set to ring on that balcony in a couple minutes there the big board, west virginia university and syracuse university, the football teams playing in the new era pinstripe bowl at yankee stadium this saturday. i know melissa is going p. >> for sure. we are carpooling, right, carl? >> at the nasdaq, iraq and afghanistan, veterans of america, a non-profit organization with more than 200,000 members. great to see them today as well. a lot of charity this morning, even on the general news morning shows about facebook. if you haven't heard already, randi zuckerberg posted a pitch of her family, thought it was private, somebody saw it on their feed, put it on twitter, she responded angrily saying it was way uncool and beyond human decency and it has raised, once again this argument, debate about privacy settings and whether or not you should tru
becomes a reality. >> reporter: a harsh reality but one with some science behind it. last year, researchers of sanford university found out once participants were introduced to their future self, they were more likely to save. sounds good in theory but not experts agree it will actually work in practice. >> i'm not actually sure a stark financial physical picture is exactly what they need in order to compel them to action. >> reporter: with more americans retiring later in life and the cost of living going up, experts say two-thirds of boomers will not have enough saved to maintain their standard of live, if they can retire at all. whether or not it will actually inspire people to take action, it certainly gets you thinking. >> it does inspire me to save for retirement, absolutely. >> reporter: now, a big thank you to our brave guinea pig, the 2,000 people who logged on to view this app, unclear how many have been spurred as we heard a lot about new year's resolutions right around the corner, if they get to the new year and decide this was scary enough to get them to start savi
. >>> it is hard to believe, but 2013 less than a week away. we're going to look back at all the science breakthroughs of the last year coming up. ♪ everybody well don't you know it's me now? ♪ ♪ yeah who's it, who's it huh? ♪ ♪ willy's back with a brand new beat now, ♪ ♪ yeah doin' it doin' it up! ♪ heyyy yeah, tryin' to bite my style! ♪ ♪ heyyy yeah, how you like me now? ♪ ♪ na na na na na na na na ♪ and everybody go uh! campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> starbucks is now pushing politicians to avoid the massive spending cuts due to go into effect six dames from now. the ceo is asking employees at the d.c. area stores to write "come together" on their coffee cups tomorrow and friday. in a letter to employees made public today, shuttle says rather than be bystanders, you and your customers have an opportunity and i believe we all have a responsibility, to send our elected officials a respectful but poten
♪ green giant >>> anyone who loves to spend time at san francisco's science museum is moving to pier 15. the last day it will be in its current location on lion street will be january 2. but it takes a lot of time to relocate so many exhibits. the exploretorium will reopen in the new home april 17. it is already a happy holiday season for the oakland zoo. it received a 1 million-dollar donation from someone who wants to remain anonymous. there are no restrictions on how the money can be spent. zoo executives call it the greatest gift they have ever received. especially welcome after last month's election after voters rejected a partial tax to help support the zoo. >>> jerry garcia would sing, if the thunder doesn't get you, the lightning will. >> i woke up and i thought here we go. >> kind of came out of the blue, i thought. >> yes. and we had a few areas isolated, thunderstorms and hail reported in some spots. and that is pushing to the east into the central valley. that is the front moving into the mountains. where the sierra will be getting it, already beginning to see the snowfall.
10 science stories of the 2012. >> reporter: at number 10, a revolutionary camera called litro. >> it's so powerful that this will forever change how we're experience pictures. >> reporter: the camera captures the entire light field allowing the picture's focus and perspective to be changed after it's been taken. number 9, nasa's dawn space craft spent back data about an asteroid called vesta. it appears vesta went through some stages of planetary evolution. it's one of a kind in the solar system. >> what's clear to us is vesta appears to be the only intact protoplanet that's left. >> reporter: number 8. you may have heard the god partg dlo big deal? think big bang theory. >> this particle we think was the fuse that set off the explosion which created the universe. >> reporter: researchers found after analyzing data from proton collisions generated by a particle accelerator. at 7, baumgartner's record breaking jump. he broke the sound barrier, jumping from 128,000 feet in a revolutionary space suit. >> i said i know the whole world is watching now and i wish the world could see what
science with five healthy alternatives to get energy that will keep you out of the hospital and keep you energetic. nice to see you. >> thank you. good morning. >> you have a company out of annapolis. >> that's correct. i have developed a company to focus on natural rather than the synthetic products on the market place. >> let's talk about some of the tips you have in terms of getting the energy that you need. >> water. water is very basic. 70% of the population is dehydrated. it can cause one to become he thar jik. you want to drink about eight 8 ounce glasses of water a day. >> i keep hearing that number fluctuates. >> it does. it depends on your activity level and the size of your body, too. >> okay. so water. number one. and then you have your product that can go into the water. >> it is a great way to deliver tasty vitamins. actually, i have created it to encourage one to drink more water. b vitamins. minerals. all support natural energy levels. >> you also talk about caffeine. we just did that story about caffeine. >> exactly. well, caffeine. everyone wants a cup of morning coffee
are hoping to clone the perfect christmas tree using some science from the firs so they give off the perfect glow and have the perfect stem and foliage. >> ainsley: they don't have open spaces in between the branches. >> rick: they're saying a lot of the trees they grow, after ten to 14 years after all the weather that happens, a big percentage aren't any good. >> ainsley: send my father there. he'll buy them. my dad would always come home with the worst tree because he felt sorry for it. my mother would have to turn it around so the open spaces were in the back in the corner. >> clayton: he felt bad for a lonely tree? >> ainsley: yeah. i think really secretly the guy gave him a deal. that's really what it was about. >> clayton: it was in the discount section. >> ainsley: how about you? >> clayton: for a while my sister was allergic to christmas tree, so we had to do the artificial. i don't know if it was the pine, or i don't know what it is. >> ainsley: it's not pine sol. that's cleaner. >> clayton: oh [ laughter ] >> rick: my family, my parents, they do a fake tree now, which actually kind
.s. department of agriculture, social science analyst. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having us. >> tomorrow, we will continue looking at fiscal cliff negotiations and how americans will be affected if the deadline passes. our guest will be joseph rosenberg, followed by a look by presidential campaigning and the influence of the electoral college. then a discussion on hurricane sandy relief funding. we will be joined by dan freed iedman. all that beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health conference. >> i think i had little antennas go up that told me when somebody had there an agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante, really any way the only one in the world he could trust. >> they were writers, journali
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